Living In Hoboken NJ: What You Need To Know

Hoboken, New Jersey is a relatively small town located on the Hudson River waterfront. Its proximity to Manhattan—along with its more affordable cost of living, has made it a popular place to live and work for decades. In recent years, however, more people have been flocking to Hoboken to escape the hustle and bustle of the Big Apple without being too far away from the action.

If you’re considering a move to Hoboken, New Jersey, there are some things you need to know in order to make your decision. From having a better understanding of Hoboken’s housing availability, Hoboken cleaning services, and cost of living to learning more about things to see and do in the area, a little information can go a long way in deciding whether a move to Hoboken is right for you.

General Information About Hoboken

Compared to Manhattan and other major NYC neighborhoods, Hoboken is a relatively small town, consisting of just a little over 53,000 residents according to the 2010 United States Census. Many people who live in Hoboken work in New York City but prefer to live somewhere a little quieter and less densely populated. Despite its small population, however, it is important to realize that the entire town is just 1.25 square miles large. It is also worth noting that the median age of a Hoboken resident is just 30, making it a relatively “young” town.

From a safety standpoint, Hoboken is about as safe as any other urban area that you may be considering a move to. Of course, there is going to be some level of crime no matter where you live, but statistically, instances of violent crime in Hoboken are relatively slim. In fact, overall crime dropped between 2017 and 2018. Violent crime specifically is down 8.4% and non-violent crime is down 19.1%, according to a statement from Hoboken Police Chief Ken Ferrante.

The climate in Hoboken is typical of the northeast United States. Many residents enjoy being able to experience all four seasons throughout the year, and it is worth noting that Hoboken is absolutely beautiful during the fall. During the winter, temperatures can drop quite a bit and snowfall can be significant, though many residents enjoy the beauty of the town during the holiday season. No matter which season is your favorite, you’ll be able to experience it in Hoboken. Unfortunately, that also comes with having to experience your least-favorite season(s)!

Hoboken has some interesting history as well. Did you know, for example, that the first American baseball game was first played in Hoboken back in 1846? Today, Hoboken’s claim-to-fame is that it’s considered the Hipster Capital of America.

Housing Availability and Pricing In Hoboken

From a cost-of-living standpoint, Hoboken is a lot more affordable than nearby Manhattan and other parts of NYC—which is what draws many people to the town in the first place. Still, the cost of living in Hoboken is quite high compared to national averages, earning it an “F” cost-of-living grade from AreaVibes.com. When you live in Hoboken, you will pay more for everything from basic groceries and goods to housing, so you’ll want to be prepared.

Speaking of housing, there is a high demand for housing in Hoboken due to the large influx of people who have been moving to the area in the past several years. Currently, the demand for housing outweighs the supply, which can make finding housing within your budget a bit challenging. The good news is that there is new residential housing development happening all across town, so there should be greater availability as these begin opening up.

The majority of the housing in Hoboken comes in the form of apartments or condominiums. Single-family homes are few and far between—and as you can probably imagine, the costs of single-family homes in Hoboken are astronomical. Even smaller condominiums can easily start around $250,000 for those interested in buying, as the median cost-per-square-foot hovers around $738. Meanwhile, the median rental price is $2,725 per month. Still, this is significantly less than the median rental rate for Manhattan, which is a whopping $3,400 per month.

Because of Hoboken’s small size, there’s a good chance that wherever you live will be relatively close to nearby nightlife and other entertainment. For this reason, Hoboken is generally not the place to move if you’re wanting to avoid noise or you are raising a family in Hoboken. Unless you can secure a high-rise rental, you’re probably going to experience some street noise. Hoboken is not a quiet town, especially when you take into consideration its relatively young residents and the colleges in the area.

Job Availability and Hot Industries In Hoboken

If you’ll be seeking employment when you move to Hoboken, it’s worth noting that the top employers in the town are in the following industries:

  • Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services
  • Finance & Insurance
  • Educational Services
  • Maid Services

There are more than 30 schools in Hoboken, including the Stevens Institute of Technology, so these educational institutions are major employers. Many people who live in Hoboken also work in New York City, particularly in nearby Manhattan.

What About Parking and Getting Around?

Wondering if you need a car to live in Hoboken? This will depend largely on where you’ll be working. For most, there is no need to own a car because the entire town is so small that it’s easily walkable. You’ll never be more than a few minutes’ walk from local bars, grocery stores, and other essentials.

In fact, if you own a car, you may actually want to consider selling it before you move to Hoboken, as parking can be difficult (and costly) to come by. Street parking is available with a monthly permit, but actually finding street parking can be a challenge. Meanwhile, some apartment buildings may have their own parking garages or parking lots available, but these will certainly come at a premium.

Getting rid of your car before moving to Hoboken will also help you avoid the notoriously high auto insurance rates that exist within the town. And if you ever need to head into the Big Apple, there are plenty of options to help you get around. There’s a bike-share program for getting around within the city and nearby suburbs, as well as a free shuttle service and inexpensive cab rides.

Is Hoboken Pet-Friendly?

If you have a dog or have been thinking about getting one after you move, you’ll be thrilled to learn that Hoboken is an incredibly dog-friendly town. Most businesses are happy to allow dogs inside and out, with the exception being restaurants and bars that serve food. This means you can more-or-less bring your dog wherever you go. There are also plenty of dog-friendly paths throughout town that are wide enough to comfortably walk with your dog.

One of the main challenges to consider when it comes to owning a dog as a Hoboken resident is the availability of housing with yard space. Unless you have a larger budget, there’s a good chance the place where you end up living won’t have much of a yard (if it has any at all). Instead, you may need to share common space with other residents or find a local park to take your dog to on a regular basis.

For this reason, many dog owners in Hoboken have dogs that are smaller breeds. These smaller breed dogs don’t require quite as much space (which is ideal in Hoboken’s smaller residences) nor do they necessarily require outdoor space to use the bathroom. Some smaller breeds, for example, can be trained to use indoor potty pads. Of course, this isn’t to say that you cannot have a large-breed dog when you live in Hoboken; plenty of residents have larger dogs. You’ll just need to be more diligent about taking them out on walks and to local dog parks so they can get plenty of exercise.

Things to See and Do in Hoboken

Hoboken is located right along the Hudson River, so you’ll never need to go far to enjoy a beautiful waterfront view of the New York City skyline similar to what you would see if you were living in Jersey City. There are also plenty of parks where you can enjoy such activities as fishing, walking, and picnicking without having to go far from home.

Where Hoboken really shines, however, is in its nightlife offerings. Everywhere you turn, it seems there are taverns, clubs, and bars to choose from. This makes sense, given that Hoboken is considered to be the “Birthplace of American Brewing.” And of course, if you ever want to venture into Manhattan or other parts of New York City, you’re not far from all the nightlife and entertainment that the Big Apple has to offer as well.

Tips For a Move to Hoboken, NJ

If you’re serious about relocating to Hoboken, you may be wondering where to begin. Because of the high demand for housing in Hoboken, finding a place that fits your needs and budget can be a challenge. The good news is that there are some tips you can follow to make your move to Hoboken a smoother one.

Consider a Broker

One option to consider to help your search for a new home, especially if you’re planning on renting, is to hire a broker. Specifically, a broker works in a similar capacity to a real estate agent by helping clients find and secure the right rental properties for their needs and budgets. In return, you end up paying your broker a percentage of your rent or a flat fee, depending on the agreed-upon set-up.

In a town like Hoboken where real estate is already difficult to come by, having a broker can be worth the added cost. Often times, brokers will have access to new listing information before it even hits the market, which may help you snag that perfect rental before someone else does. On the flip side, it may be worth contacting some rental properties directly (especially newer ones) to inquire about availability before you shell out money for a broker. You never know what you might find.

Read the Fine Print

When renting in Hoboken or Weehawken, make sure to read your lease agreement thoroughly before you sign. Ideally, you should receive a copy of your lease agreement to review prior to the day of your scheduled lease signing. This will give you the time needed to read everything and request clarification on key points as needed. Specifically, make sure to look for clauses regarding parking availability if you plan on bringing a car with you. If you plan on bringing a pet or adopting one once you move in, you’ll also want to find out what your landlord’s restrictions or rules are regarding breeds, pet fees, and additional deposits.

Don’t Skimp on Movers

Whether you’re relocating from nearby Manhattan or from somewhere across the country, hiring professional movers to assist you is almost always worth the cost. A moving company can take a lot of the stress out of relocating and getting settled into your new place. And with many residences in Hoboken being located within multiple-story buildings, the last thing you want is to have to haul your heavy furniture up a set of stairs. Leave it to the professionals instead. Hiring movers will be some of the best money you spend on your upcoming move.

Hire a Move-In/Move-Out Cleaner

Before you move into your new place in Hoboken, you may also want to consider hiring a professional cleaning service. Specifically, look for a company that offers move-in cleanings, which will ensure that your new place is spotless and ready for you to move your belongings in. Hiring a cleaner to take care of this can save you the time, stress, and hassle of trying to clean the space yourself before your big move.

If you’re moving out of another apartment in the NYC area, you may also want to hire the same company to complete a move-out cleaning service. Again, this will save you time and may help you more easily obtain your security deposit from your landlord.

At Maid Sailors, we offer move-in and move-out cleaning services for NYC and the surrounding areas, including Hoboken! We also offer routine cleaning, green/eco-friendly cleaning, laundry service, deep cleaning, organization services, and much more. Ultimately, our goal is to take the stress and hassle of cleaning off your hands so you can better enjoy your time in Hoboken. Find out more about our professional cleaning services by contacting us today at (212) 299-5170. You can also set up your service with us by using our convenient online form, allowing you to schedule your move-in/move-out cleaning in as little as 60 seconds! We look forward to helping you with your upcoming move.

Clean Getaways: Tokyo This Summer

While we love New York City and do our best to service the millions of hardworking, coffee-drinking dreamers living in the five boroughs, Maid Sailors knows an out-of-city vacation makes sense. Keeping your own place clean is hard enough – it’s no surprise that keeping New York City clean is an impossible task. Instead of holding out for something that’ll (probably) never happen, take a vacation this summer and experience a squeaky clean modern city to gain some perspective on how the cleaner half actually lives.

Culture of Clean

Tokyo is a shining (if not shocking) example of how a modern, Western city can operate on a completely clean basis. The citizens of Tokyo embody a “culture of clean” that flows through every alleyway, highway and subway. Take this to your head: Tokyo rarely has garbage cans laying on street corners. Why? People are expected to either dispose of their trash in their homes or in restaurants; if individuals manage to “create” trash on the street, they keep it with them and dispose of it in in their homes. Because there are rarely any trash cans, people don’t bother relying on the streets because they know they’ll be married to it for the hours they remain outside. Next time you see a “filled to the brim”, brown-and-green trash can in Manhattan, remember: the city might actually be better off without it.

Rats? What are those?

You can eat off the floor in Tokyo’s subways. Well, maybe this isn’t true for all of them, but one of our clients recently came back from a trip from Tokyo’s Shinjuku region (where there are very many office buildings), and glowingly commented on the pristine and organized nature of Tokyo’s subways. Trains are timely, people rush politely and dispose of trash rarely. If a rat were to find itself lost in the subway, it would certainly die even if a single train never came. Why? Because there’s no pizza to nibble on or leftover Coca Cola to drink. Tokyo’s public transportation is (generally) rodent and insect free because there’s no food for them to thrive on – keep this in mind next time you’re waiting for the F train.

High-end Bars Live Up to the Hype

Ironically, there’s an immaculate place called “New York Bar” at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Tokyo. In an admittedly cute homage to New York, the restaurant serves expensive steak, plays live jazz, has heavy cocktails and allows smoking. Aside from Marlboro fumes permeating the air, the restaurant is a fantastic place to experience what a clean, immaculate New York could look and feel like. Not to mention, the restaurant is on the top floor and gives you an absolutely breathtaking view of Tokyo’s beautiful city (partially pictured above). An experience at this restaurant alone is worth the 12 hour flight.

Concluding Remarks

If you’re looking for a clean urban experience this summer, look no further than Tokyo. The business district offers the Western dining, drinking and shopping experiences you’ve grown accustomed to while maintaining its unique exoticness. While you’ll return to the city rejuvenated, you’ll feel frustrated as you wonder: if Tokyo’s so clean, why can’t New York be the same way?