Cleaning Aftermath: Post-Renovation Disaster Management

The Cleaning  Aftermath

If you’re having your apartment or house renovated then you really should start thinking about cleaning your place, post-renovation, which is when the real work begins! Builders and renovators are not professional cleaners. Thus, after they’re finished installing your new kitchen or fixing your bathroom, all that dust floats from room to room. It gets stuck on every surface, leaving no orifice behind! Unfortunately, for situations as heavy as this, a simple sweep or quick mop of the floor just won’t do.

The best solution is to invest in hiring seasoned, professional cleaners (like Maid Sailors), which will save you a lot of time, trouble, and potentially, injury. But, for those brave souls who choose to go it alone, we’ve drafted these tips on how to eradicate all of that dust and grime from your newly renovated living space!

Post-Renovation Disaster Management

  • Anticipate the storm. First off, there’s nothing like preparation and taking extra precautions to make sure dust doesn’t damage any of your electrical appliances or furniture. Do this by covering all your home items with plastic sheeting and/or bags and make sure they are well sealed with duct tape.

    Another very useful tip: keep windows open during renovations. This will allow a lot of dust and stray particles to venture out into the wild (versus settling in your living room). Most people don’t bother with preparation and begin the cleaning process after the builders have completed renovations. Don’t end up like most people. If you do a little preparation, you will avoid costly mistakes!

  • Dealing with floor dust. The last builder just walked out of your door and left you the delightful early Christmas present of a white, dusty floor. However, before you reach for that broom, think again! Sweeping dust usually means you’re just transporting it somewhere else, so why waste your precious time and energy? Sweeping is only a good idea if there are larger pieces of debris on the floor.

    First, in order to avoid suffocation, make sure the room is well ventilated. Next, use your vacuum cleaner to pick up the initial first-round of that stubborn dust. You’ll notice that after all of your cleaning and clearance efforts, there will still be some stubborn dust remnants. Finish the job by mopping your floor quickly, ultimately ridding your floors of that pesky dust. Extra credit goes to those who use a strong domestic cleaning product; while you’ll notice smudges on your floor at first, these will subside after a quick second coat.

  • Dealing with more dust. Now it’s important when cleaning to remember that builders’ dust doesn’t just limit itself to landing on your floor! It gets trapped on skirting boards, windowsills, shelves and just about any other surface in your living space. Ultimately, you can use a damp cloth. Pick it all up and really get into those tight corners.

Remember, if all of this sounds like too much work and you don’t have time to effectively prepare you can hire professional cleaners who will get the job done and leave your counters sparkling. In any case, remember that patience is paramount to a successful builder. If you rush it you won’t do a very good job. It’s important to be as thorough. After all, it is your home!

Fixing A Dishwasher That Won’t Drain

Having a dishwasher that won’t drain can be frustrating and repairing it through a service provider can be expensive. Repairing a dishwasher is not a difficult process. The key is to troubleshoot your machine to identify the source of the drain problem and then fix it. Sometimes, the solution may be as simple as just cleaning your dishwasher. Below we have provided you with a list of the most common issues for a dishwasher that won’t drain.

Check the Door Latch

An unlatched dishwasher door will keep your dishwasher from draining. Believe it or not, this is the most common problem that people overlook when troubleshooting a dishwasher that won’t drain. If the door is unlatched, latch it and check it again to see if it drains.

Check for Clogs

The most likely cause for a dishwasher drainage problem is a clog. Over time, your filters and pipes can fill up with food particles and other items that don’t always make it out of the plumbing system. You can remove clogs by doing the following:

  • Remove and clean all food traps and filters
  • Use a snake on the hoses and pipes
  • Run your garbage disposal with hot water as your dishwasher operates

Regular cleaning plays a big part in keeping your dishwasher working properly. Since most drain issues are the result of clogs, you should be sure to properly rinse your dishes before loading. Also, regularly wipe out and clean the inside of your dishwasher with a mild cleaning solution or use a commercial cleaning tablet on an empty wash every so often. When you keep it free of debris, you keep your water flowing smoothly.

Check your Garbage Disposal Drain Plug

If you’ve recently installed a new garbage disposal unit, this may be the source of your drain problems. Your garbage disposal is linked to your dishwasher, and a new garbage disposal comes with a special part that can keep your washer from draining. If you have installed a new disposal, look for the knockout plug. The drain plug in your garbage disposal (usually a small plastic or metal insert) should be removed.

Check the Drain Valve

Normally, as this valve gets power during the drain cycle, it opens a solenoid and allows water to drain. But not all dishwashers use this valve. If yours does, and if it is not working, you may need to replace it.

Check the Belt

Some older dishwashers may use a belt-driven pump. If the belt has come off or is slipping then the pump that drains the washer won’t function properly. Inspect the belt for signs of wear or stretching and replace it if required.

Check the Float

The float switch on your dishwasher may get stuck, causing water to remain in the appliance between washes. Depending on your washer, this may be a small float nestled in a corner or a hat-shaped device on the floor of your dishwasher. A broken float will require replacement or repair.

Check the Motor

Finally, a malfunctioning motor may not be able to pump the water out of the machine and into your plumbing. If you suspect a motor issue, it’s best to call in a professional to assess your motor and perform any repairs or replacements safely.